0

March 4, 2011 AT 3:35 pm

Tissue Engineer Prints Replacement Kidneys on Demand

 Files Imagecache Article Image Large Articles Picture-3 17

Tissue Engineer Prints Replacement Kidneys on Demand… Printer ink is still more expensive than kidneys –

One of PopSci’s favorite regenerative medicine specialists, Anthony Atala, printed a real kidney on stage at the 2011 TED conference Thursday, in a technique that could be used to create new organs from a patient’s own tissue rather than relying on donated organs.

“It’s like baking a cake,” Atala said.

A few years ago, Atala figured out how to produce human tissue with a desktop inkjet printer, using cells as the printer ink. In a TED talk last year, he described printing heart valves and other tissues. This week at TED, he brought one of his patients on stage. When he was 10, Luke Massella was among the first people to receive a printed kidney — now he’s a healthy college student.

The process employs scanners that collect a 3-D image of the organ that needs to be replaced. A small tissue sample, which AFP describes as the size of a postage stamp, seeds the printer, which replicates the tissue layer by layer to build a new organ, all in about six hours. It uses the patient’s own tissue, so it avoids any organ rejection issues.

When people ask us “what the future of open source hardware” – we think this is a neat preview, it’s a bit of OSHW 3D printers, thingiverse for people, genes and organs with a dash of Instructables. And depending on how health care goes, KickStarter.


Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground”Adafruit’s Apps!


Maker Business — Alibaba to invest $15b in tech, set up research labs around the world

Wearables — Hand beading mimicry

Electronics — Trigger happy oscilloscope?

Biohacking — Biohacking: Visioneer – AI Glasses to Assist the Visually Impaired

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a "maker business", electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !



No Comments

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.