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The Machine to Build the Machines‬‏

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb7foG1rtlA

How NeXT computers were made…

Promotion video from NeXT, Inc. about their factory and manufacturing process. Also briefly contains an all-too-short clip of some NeXT premiere…

PICK AND PLACE ROBOTS


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4 Comments

  1. Beautiful film. Everything I’ve read about the NeXT manufacturing environment left me with the impression that it was very non-industrial, reminds me of what we’re seeing today in desktop manufacturing. I’m very proud to own one of these machines.

  2. All of that trouble to design their own, advanced pick-and-place, and how many of the NeXTcube motherboards did they ever build? Seems like a great deal of engineering for a product that was manufactured in small numbers. Since they were always so guarded about the numbers, I don’t think I’ve ever seen an estimate of the number of NeXTcubes made. Thousands, certainly, but did they even make 10,000?

  3. Dug this up via wikipedia:

    http://www.wired.com/gadgets/mac/commentary/cultofmac/2005/12/69888

    “… in the four years NeXT made hardware, only about 50,000 Cubes sold.”

  4. steve jobs once again advances the state of the art in electronics manufacturing.

    this is a fitting tribute to our brave industrial robots. *salutes*

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