0

August 8, 2011 AT 12:45 pm

AIR VEHICLE C++ CODING STANDARDS

Pt 101422

Bill G., the author of the fantastic SDfat library that Arduino uses to talk to SD cards passed along this document detailing a list of rules that military embedded programmers follow when designing embedded C++. This is handy brush up for all of us who write embedded code (PDF).

The intent of this document is to provide direction and guidance to C++ programmers that will enable them to employ good programming style and proven programming practices leading to safe, reliable, testable, and maintainable code. Consequently, the rules contained in this document are required for Air Vehicle C++ development1 and recommended for non-Air Vehicle C++ development.

As indicated above, portions of Air Vehicle (AV) code will be developed in C++. C++ was designed to support data abstraction, object-oriented programming, and generic programming while retaining compatibility with traditional C programming techniques.


Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground”Adafruit’s Apps!


Maker Business — Kickstarter Hardware Studio

Wearables — A soft glow

Electronics — Through Hole SMD

Biohacking — Ultra Runner Kilian Jornet Summits Everest in 26 Hours

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a "maker business", electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !



4 Comments

  1. Kevin Townsend

    Great find! While languages like C# have fairly widely accepted ‘standards’ that most professional developers seem to follow, C and C++ tend to be all over the place for things like naming conventions, etc. There’s a lot of wisdom in the document referenced above. Definately have to print a copy out and slap some notes in the margins.

  2. Kevin Townsend

    Oh … can I recommend the guide to writing unmaintainable code?

    http://mindprod.com/jgloss/unmain.html

    Naming Rule #18: Bedazzling Names

    Choose variable names with irrelevant emotional connotation, e. g.:
    marypoppins = ( superman + starship ) / god;

    This confuses the reader because they have difficulty disassociating the emotional connotations of the words from the logic they’re trying to think about.

  3. amazing

  4. Richard Perrin

    If you don’t write embedded C++ code in a critical environment, I’d urge you to walk away from this and read a general software style guide like "The Practice of Programming" or "The Pragmatic Programmer" or "Code Complete". Or the "Effective C++" books, or any of the other C++ guides that encourage you to master a subsection of the language.

    This is 146 pages of specification constraining how C++ should be used when developing software for military aircraft embedded systems. It ain’t fun. It is full of hard-won lessons about how not to shoot yourself in the foot (or more appropriately for the language: how not to blow your whole leg off) when writing large embedded C++ modules and projects in large teams. This can be a joyless experience, and in fact I’m sure many embedded developers had a joyless experience working on the JSF project. I know at least one that found it so.

    If you are looking for guidelines on better embedded C++, skim this, use your common sense, but don’t let it cramp your style.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.