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December 11, 2011 AT 7:50 pm

A little drop of magic

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A little drop of magic

They look as delicate as jellyfish and as strange as something from another planet . . . but all these magical images were created by nothing more than drops of liquid colliding, and were captured by a digital camera in a makeshift studio.

Corrie White, 63, has spent many hours perfecting the art of liquid-drop photography but admits that many of her amazing images are ‘flukes’.

Mrs White took up the hobby only three years ago, before which she was content to take standard snaps of her four children and nine grandchildren. But she was ‘mesmerised’ when she stumbled across the work of US photographer Martin Waugh, who creates what he  calls ‘liquid sculpture’, and decided to begin her own experiments.


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2 Comments

  1. Over 50 years ago, Harold Edgerton made similar photos using a film camera and special stroboscopic lighting- no mean feat back then. Read about this amazing pioneer here:
    http://web.mit.edu/edgerton/spotlight/Spotlight.html

  2. adafruit_support

    Got to meet ‘Doc’ Edgerton when he visited RIT/SPAS when I was a student there many years ago. After showing us some of his amazing images, he shared the schematics for a lot of the equipment he used to make them. Let’s hear it for open source!

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