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June 1, 2012 AT 12:00 am

google-blockly – A visual programming language

Sample

google-blockly – A visual programming language.

Blockly is a web-based, graphical programming language. Users can drag blocks together to build an application. No typing required.


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6 Comments

  1. Now they just need to make it be able to target C, give it a LCARS skin, and release it for ‘droid.

  2. It looks like another version of Scratch…

  3. There are lots of these graphical/visual programming languages/environments coming out lately. I know at least 3 for arduino (before finishing coffee, more may be recalled afterwards).

    I wonder how good these are – individually and collectively – for learning and for building applications. Does the learning translate well to traditional, production languages? How well do individual environments perform for real usage by students?

    Does anyone have a listing and/or comparison of current VPLs for arduino and similar embedded development?
    Q for educators – what is your experience with these in teaching noobs and moving them beyond basics?

  4. @jerry- this sounds like a great article you could write up comparing these for educators, we’d love to run it here on adafruit.

  5. The blocks look almost identical to the ones in Google (now MIT) Appinventor, but it looks like it only implements a *tiny* bit of actual language; the examples seem to be about using it to add user scripting to existing systems, rather than to write entire applications with (which sounds about right, actually, Appinventor is seductive at first and gets really frustrating about the time you actually fill the page…)

  6. Call me crazy but that IF statement is harder on the eyes than a real IF statement in C.

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