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Ball-jointed articulated dragon

dragon-duo

Articulated dragon models. Cast polyurethane resin (not 3D printed).

Ball Jointed Dragon via Muddy Colors


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3 Comments

  1. I think it’s funny that we’re transitioning into an age where emphasis needs to be placed on things not being printed. That said, I wish it was printed, since then it would have a chance of being a more easily shared design!

    Hmmm, I wonder if maybe Jason Welsh could be inspired into making an articulated dragon along the lines of his already crazy 38 and 70 articulation-point action figures. 🙂

  2. i thought it was printed. i cant read Russian and relying on google translate but the comment on 24/08/2013 at 22:13 said
    “. Gaallo. ,Thank you!) No, of course not a secret – it is printed, but not on a highly accurate printer, and on the home” addressing Gaallo’s question regarding if it was printed just above. So i assumed it was, but polyurethane was also mentioned in comments. could it be possible that it was prototyped on a 3d printer, then used those printed parts to make molds for resin casting?

  3. Chris Benjamins: exactly that, yes. Prototyped with 3D printing, but there was a LOT of subsequent finishing work. The production dolls (as in the photo) are cast from molds, not directly printed.

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