NEW PRODUCT – Teensy 3.1 + header

1625_LRG

NEW PRODUCT – Teensy 3.1 + headerTeensy 3.1 is a small, breadboard-friendly development board designed by Paul Stoffregen and PJRC. Teensy 3.1 brings a low-cost 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 platform to hobbyists, students and engineers, using an adapted version of the Arduino IDE (Teensyduino) or programming directly in C language. Teensy 3.1 is an upgrade over 3.0: now with 64K of RAM, 256K of Flash, 5V tolerant digital inputs, 12 bit DAC, dual ADC, and CAN bus support. Teensy 3.1 is a drop-in replacement upgrade for 3.0 and can run any sketches designed for 3.0.

Based on a 32 bit ARM chip, Teensy 3.1 aims to greatly increase the computing capability and peripheral features, but maintain the same easy-to-use platform that has made Teensy 2.0 so successful.

Please note: Teensy 3 and 2 are not official Arduino-brand products. Although the Teensyduino IDE has been adapted so that many simple Arduino projects will work with the Teensy, there will still be a lot of libraries and shields that will not work with this device! If you’re new to microcontrollers, we suggest going with a classic Arduino UNO since all Arduino projects, examples and libraries will work with it.

Technical Specifications:

  • 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 48 MHz CPU (M4 = DSP extensions) Here is Freescale’s reference manual for the chip (warning 1227 pages) as well as the Datasheet and User Guide!
  • 256K Flash Memory, 64K RAM, 2K EEPROM
  • 21* High Resolution Analog Inputs (13 bits usable, 16 bit hardware)
  • 34* Digital I/O Pins (21 shared with analog)
  • 10 PWM outputs
  • 1 12-bit DAC output
  • 8 Timers for intervals/delays, separate from PWM
  • USB with dedicated DMA memory transfers
  • CAN bus
  • 3 UARTs (serial ports)
  • SPI, I2C, I2S, IR modulator
  • I2S (for high quality audio interface)
  • Real Time Clock (with user-added 32.768 crystal and battery)
  • 16 general purpose DMA channels (separate from USB)
  • Touch Sensor Inputs

Information, documentation and specs are on the Teensy site. Please check it out for more details!

In stock and shipping now!


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1 Comment

  1. What is the recommended way of connecting to pins 24-33, etc. on the bottom side of the board? These are rectangular solder pads rather than through-hole. Is there some SMD header that we can use to bring these pins out?

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