0

January 9, 2014 AT 6:00 am

#3DxArchitecture – Michael Hansmeyer & Benjamin Dillenburger’s Digital Grotesque: Printing Architecture #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3D

Michael Hansmeyer & Benjamin Dillenburger’s Digital Grotesque: Printing Architecture:

New materials and fabrication methods have historically led to radical changes in architectural design. They have indeed been the primary drivers in its evolution. Today, additive manufacturing heralds a revolution in fabrication for design. Yet in architecture, this technology has up to now been used only for small scale models.

Digital Grotesque takes additive manufacturing technology to a true architectural scale. Not a small model is printed, but the actual room itself. Digital Grotesque presents a fully immersive, solid, human-scale enclosed structure with a perplexing level of detail. Its geometry consists of hundreds of millions of individual facets printed at a resolution of a tenth of a millimeter, constituting a 3.2-meter high, 16 square meter large room.

The potentials of additive manufacturing in architecture are enormous. Architectural details can reach the threshold of human perception. There is no longer a cost associated with complexity, as printing a highly detailed grotto costs the same as printing a primitive cube. Nor is there a cost for customization: fabricating highly individual elements costs no more than printing a standardized series. Ornament and formal expression are no longer a luxury – they are now legitimized.

With additive manufacturing, architectural design can be performed entirely in three dimensions without a need for plans, sections, and construction drawings. There are almost no fabrication constraints.

With this technology, the scale for the designer has shrunk from bricks to bits. Architecture can be defined at the scale of sandcorns, materiality can be synthesized. What shall be done with this newfound freedom? In a 1971 lecture to students, Louis Kahn stated:

You say to brick, “What do you want, brick?”
Brick says to you, “I like an arch.”
If you say to brick, “Arches are expensive, and I can use a concrete lintel over an opening. What do you think of that brick?”
Brick says, “I like an arch.”

The question today is: What would a grain of sand like to be?

Digital Grotesque in figures:

Virtual:

  • Algorithmically generated geometry
  • 260 million surfaces
  • 30 billion voxels
  • 78 GB production data

Physical:

  • Sand-printed elements (silicate and binder)
  • 16 square meters, 3.2 meters high
  • 11 tons of printed sandstone
  • 0.13 mm layer resolution
  • 4.0 x 2.0 x 1.0 meter maximum print space

Design Development: 1 year

Printing: 1 month

Assembly: 1 day

Read More.

Pasted Image 1 9 14 3 07 AM 2

Pasted Image 1 9 14 3 08 AM

Pasted Image 1 9 14 3 09 AM 2


Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground”Adafruit’s Apps!


Maker Business — Transforming Today’s Bad Jobs into Tomorrow’s Good Jobs

Wearables — Hot glue free zone

Electronics — Have you met Charlie?

Biohacking — Ticks are Spreading an Allergy to Meat

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a "maker business", electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !



No Comments

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.