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Light Up Cyberman Costume

cyberman costume

One of the cool things about dressing up like a Cyberman from Doctor Who is that the guidelines are flexible. Though the basics are the same, the look of the race changes slightly in each era of Doctor Who they appear in. Instructables user pokiespout based her light up design from the 1967 serial “The Moonbase.” She used epoxy, plastic tubing, coveralls, a circuit board, and more to create the cool outfit. She used papier mache for the helmet:

The first thing I did, through sheer trial and error, was to construct a basic skeleton of the mask using poster board, and duct tape it together. It was essentially built right on my face. I would wrap it around, figure out what I needed to cut next, and duct tape it into place. I tied some lengths of yarn around it, to keep the face bent into the shape I wanted while I applied the papier mache. I also attached the flange around the bottom, which helps the neck appear thinner and sort of integrates the whole piece into the suit. You can use whatever process you find easiest when it comes to building the infrastructure of the mask, but keep in mind that you want the finished product to be as symmetrical as possible. Square off your board and draw a line bisecting it, and be careful to mirror all the changes you make. When it came to making the “chin”, for example, I put my head through the neck area, with the faceplate only attached at the top. I then measured how far I would need the bottom of the faceplate to protrude in order to accommodate my rather long nose, and then cut a contoured strip of poster board to fill that gap. I taped it loosely into place, put the mask on again, and if it wasn’t exactly right I made adjustments. There is no hard-and-fast pattern to something like this. All of the tape lines you can see in the early pictures are from inserting additional shunts of poster board for just this reason.

cyberman chest plate

Read more at Instructables.


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