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How To Bulid A Raspberry Pi VPN Part Two: Creating An Encrypted Client Side #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi

Building A Raspberry Pi VPN Part Two Creating An Encrypted Client Side ReadWrite

Create an encrypted client side for your Raspberry Pi VPN. via Lauren Orsini at ReadWrite

Welcome to Part Two of ReadWrite’s Raspberry Pi VPN server tutorial!

By now, it’s pretty apparent that turning your Raspberry Pi into a Virtual Private Network is an all-evening activity. But as security flaws further compromise our Internet lives, it feels increasingly worth it to have a secure server on your side. That way, you’re free to write emails and transfer data without worrying about what or whom might be intercepting it as it travels from your computer to the Web.

See also: Building A Raspberry Pi VPN Part One: How And Why To Build A Server

If you’ve followed the steps from Part One of this tutorial, you’ve got a fully functional VPN server on your Raspberry Pi. You can use this to connect securely to your home network wherever there’s an unencrypted wireless connection. You can also access shared files and media you keep stored on your home network.

Only, you can’t access those files just yet. We’ve created keys for clients (computers and devices) to use, but we haven’t told the clients where to find the server, how to connect, or which key to use.

If you remember, we created several different client keys for each of the devices we want to grant VPN access. We called them Client1, Client2 and Client3.

It’d be a lot of trouble to generate a new configuration file for each client from scratch, which is why we’ll use an ingenious script written by Eric Jodoin of the SANS institute. Instead of generating a file for each client on our own, this script will do it for us.

Full Tutorial


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