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New Guide: Kali Linux on the Raspberry Pi 2 with PiTFT Displays

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Since the Pi 2 came out, we’ve seen a lot of requests for help getting the PiTFT to work with Kali Linux. Forum users have done a pretty good job explaining some approaches, but we figured a guide and a build of the kernel with our patches + Kali’s patches would be good:

Kali Linux is a distribution especially aimed at penetration testing and network security applications. (It’s a successor to Backtrack Linux.)

Kali isn’t intended as a general-purpose desktop OS for end users. Instead, it’s a collection of useful tools for monitoring, exploring, and attacking networks. It comes out of the box with tools like Wireshark, nmap, and Aircrack-ng, and is particularly useful in situations where you just want a disposable machine/installation with some network tools.

Enter the Raspberry Pi: Cheap, portable, low-power, and easy to customize. There’s been a lot of interest in using small ARM boxes like the Pi with Kali, and it’s well-supported by the maintainers.

Since the Raspberry Pi 2 was released, we’ve gotten a series of requests for help with getting PiTFT displays to work with Kali on the Pi 2. This guide explains how to do that, and includes a kernel package built with both our PiTFT configuration and the patches applied for a standard Kali Linux build.

You’ll need the following:

This guide assumes some experience with GNU/Linux systems, and relies heavily on the command line.

Check it out on the Learning System! And please let me know if you give it a try and run into any complications. Things seem to be working well for me, but I’m not a heavy user of Kali, so it’s always possible I’ve missed something important.


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