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September 1, 2015 AT 7:37 am

#TheNew10 @ustreasury Grace Hopper & Sally Ride for the $20/$50 bills @ghc @sallyridesci

In June, the United States Treasury announced that a woman would replace Alexander Hamilton on the bill, with the only criterion being that the person chosen must be dead

This is happening!

We’re a technology company that has a mission of getting more young people, specifically young women, interested in engineering (and more). We have a couple suggestions to consider for the $10/$20/$50 bills. You can make suggestions using Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or a form using hashtag #TheNew10 (more here – https://thenew10.treasury.gov/share-your-ideas).

If you want to contact the U.S. Dept. of the Treasury directly check out their contact page. If you happen to know Treasury Secretary Jack Lew or Treasurer Rosie Rios, get the word out 🙂

Grace Hopper
First up, Grace Hopper.

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1944, invented the first compiler for a computer programming language, and was one of those who popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term “debugging” for fixing computer glitches (in one instance, removing a moth from a computer). Owing to her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”. The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USSHopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC.


Why? The future is code, for art, for science, for business for everything – celebrating a pioneer in the field sends a signal to anyone that this is important. It would be super cool to have all sorts of servers and wires drawn on the currency too.


Sally Ride

Next up, Sally Ride.

Sally Kristen Ride (May 26, 1951 – July 23, 2012) was an American physicist and astronaut. Born in Los Angeles, she joined NASA in 1978 and became the first American woman in space in 1983. She remains the youngest American astronaut to have traveled to space, having done so at the age of 32. After flying twice on the Orbiter Challenger, she left NASA in 1987. She worked for two years at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Arms Control, then at the University of California, San Diego as a professor of physics, primarily researching nonlinear optics and Thomson scattering. She served on the committees that investigated the Challenger and Columbia space shuttle disasters, the only person to participate on both.

Why? First American woman in space, if we’re going to make it as a species, we’re going to need to explore, learn and build, in space. The currency could also reflect the sacrifices the Challenger crew and others have given in our collective quest to explore.


From the NYTimes

Eleanor Roosevelt, Harriet Tubman and Sacagawea are the front-runners for the new face of the $10 bill, according to a poll. Alexander Hamilton, the first U.S. Treasury secretary, will remain a part of the new bill, which won’t begin circulating until 2020.

Read more.


Related:
GraceHopper.org
Sally Ride Science.


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