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May 3, 2016 AT 3:25 pm

ESP8266 ‘Firmware Over The Air’ #IoT #IoTuesday

I cannot agree more with this need, to update firmware OTA. Having to dislodge any project or product that is already on and running, to locally connect it, simply to update firmware to fix a problem, is a cumbersome step that contradicts the intentions of the IoT. Firmware over the air (“FOTA”) is no doubt becoming more common and this post by Martin Harizanov should inspire you if you require a FOTA solution.

With the IoT booming nowadays, the number of connected devices grows exponentially and so does the related software that drives them. There is no doubt that Firmware Over The Air (FOTA) is a highly desirable – if not required – feature for any embedded project/product both DIY or commercial. Being able to provide a remote firmware update is obviously very beneficial. The opportunity here is to enhance product functionality, operational features and provide fixes for particular issues. Updating the firmware OTA may eliminate the need to bring a product into a service center for a repair. Although not every issue can be resolved with a firmware update, if one is available for a particular issue, it can save a lot of time and money.

FOTA

push_FOTA

Read more here.


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2 Comments

  1. Yeah I completely agree – it’s hard but doesn’t have to be big – the kernel, including networking and SUOTA, for my (as yet undeployed) Burning Man mesh project fits in 8k – software deployment is done with a simple “make push” that updates one unit, units in the mesh update each other

  2. The unit-to-unit push is also smart; hive mind in full effect, love it!

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