0

September 26, 2016 AT 1:52 pm

Comparing Temperature/Humidity Sensors

Adafruit 1759

Comparing Temperature/Humidity Sensors.

Adafruit has a number of options for temperature and humidity sensors. Most of them use I2C to communicate (the exception is the DHT22, which uses a special one-wire data protocol). Some of these sensors are supposed to be more accurate than others, which may be true, and some are supposed to be faster at data acquisition than others, which is definitely true. I decided to compare sensors using a Raspberry Pi 3 for sensor control and data acquisition and a fairly powerful laptop running R to do the analysis.


Check out all the Circuit Playground Episodes! Our new kid’s show and subscribe!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground”Adafruit’s Apps!


Maker Business — “The Future of Vegas Revenue Is an Illusion”

Wearables — Tin efficiently

Electronics — Diamonds may be forever… but components? Not so much.

Biohacking — Kardia from AliveCor – Medical Grade EKG for Your Phone

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a "maker business", electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !



1 Comment

  1. From the article:

    > One thing to note, though, is that the Chinese BME280 uses 0x76 for the default address, unlike “real” BME280s, which use 0x77. This makes me suspicious that I don’t have the real Bosch chip on the board, which is the reason I’ve ordered “real” BME280s from Adafruit. If you use the Chinese version, you have to change the address in the BME280 code.

    The I2C address of BME280 is configurable to be either 0x76 or 0x77 based on the value at the SDO pin. When using a breakout board, this would usually depend on the design of that particular board, so there’s no sense in which a BME280 set to the address 0x76 is not “real.” The author’s Chinese BME280 breakout board could, of course, contain a fake chip, but the address used does not suggest that in any way.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.