Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2018: Attention! Place all UPS 3 Day orders by 11am ET Thursday 12/13/2018
0

‘EC2 Instances (F1) with Programmable Hardware’ (FPGA) for Amazon Web Services

Jeff Barr & others are writing up some interesting developer-focused blogs articles and how-to guides over at the Amazon Web Services blog, like this one about programmable hardware:

Have you ever had to decide between a general purpose tool and one built for a very specific purpose? The general purpose tools can be used to solve many different problems, but may not be the best choice for any particular one. Purpose-built tools excel at one task, but you may need to do that particular task infrequently.

Computer engineers face this problem when designing architectures and instruction sets, almost always pursuing an approach that delivers good performance across a very wide range of workloads. From time to time, new types of workloads and working conditions emerge that are best addressed by custom hardware. This requires another balancing act: trading off the potential for incredible performance vs. a development life cycle often measured in quarters or years.

Enter the FPGA
One of the more interesting routes to a custom, hardware-based solution is known as a Field Programmable Gate Array, or FPGA. In contrast to a purpose-built chip which is designed with a single function in mind and then hard-wired to implement it, an FPGA is more flexible. It can be programmed in the field, after it has been plugged in to a socket on a PC board. Each FPGA includes a fixed, finite number of simple logic gates. Programming an FPGA is “simply” a matter of connecting them up to create the desired logical functions (AND, OR, XOR, and so forth) or storage elements (flip-flops and shift registers). Unlike a CPU which is essentially serial (with a few parallel elements) and has fixed-size instructions and data paths (typically 32 or 64 bit), the FPGA can be programmed to perform many operations in parallel, and the operations themselves can be of almost any width, large or small.

Read more.


Stop breadboarding and soldering – start making immediately! Adafruit’s Circuit Playground is jam-packed with LEDs, sensors, buttons, alligator clip pads and more. Build projects with Circuit Playground in a few minutes with the drag-and-drop MakeCode programming site, learn computer science using the CS Discoveries class on code.org, jump into CircuitPython to learn Python and hardware together, or even use Arduino IDE. Circuit Playground Express is the newest and best Circuit Playground board, with support for MakeCode, CircuitPython, and Arduino. It has a powerful processor, 10 NeoPixels, mini speaker, InfraRed receive and transmit, two buttons, a switch, 14 alligator clip pads, and lots of sensors: capacitive touch, IR proximity, temperature, light, motion and sound. A whole wide world of electronics and coding is waiting for you, and it fits in the palm of your hand.

Join 9,200+ makers on Adafruit’s Discord channels and be part of the community! http://adafru.it/discord

CircuitPython – Python on Microcontrollers is here!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Follow Adafruit on Instagram for top secret new products, behinds the scenes and more https://www.instagram.com/adafruit/


Maker Business — Japanese word working and more in December’s issue of HackSpace magazine!

Wearables — Solder-less magic

Electronics — = != ==.

Biohacking — Finding Bliss with Anandamide

Python for Microcontrollers — sysfs is dead! long live libgpiod! libgpiod for linux & Python running hardware @circuitpython @micropython @ThePSF #Python @Adafruit #Adafruit

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a "maker business", electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !



No Comments

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.