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March 14, 2017 AT 7:28 pm

Comparing Gyroscope Datasheets

Reading (and writing!) datasheets is both an artform and a science, and requires a heavy dose of skepticism and attention to detail on the reader’s part. Comparing similar parts should be easy by just opening all the datasheets up, but as you’ll see in Comparing Gyroscope Datasheets, it’s rarely straightforward, and usually takes a lot more effort than it should.

This learning guide was something we put together just as an internal comparison, but we wanted to publish it as an interesting study in comparing terminology and published figures (or the lack thereof) to compare what you think a silicon vendor is giving you, with what they’re actually guaranteeing (or what they are avoiding giving any guarantees at all about!).


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1 Comment

  1. I don’t think you can assume that gyro drift / zero offset is going to be stable on any of these devices across temperatures.

    If you want the lowest possible gyro drift then you have to measure and calibrate manually or use any available built-in calibration, e.g. the MPU9250 has an option that can auto calibrate the gyro (DMP_FEATURE_GYRO_CAL) when using the DMP (on-chip sensor fusion).

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