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June 13, 2017 AT 5:00 am

MIT Explores How to Make 3D Printing Organic #MakerEducation

Demaerre 3dprinting

Via EdTech Magazine.

Though colleges have found a number of uses for 3D printers, from creating toys and art to building models of molecules, Massachusetts Institute of Technology is among the first to make strides in making the mainstream 3D printing process more organic.

Earlier this year, MIT researchers successfully 3D printed using cellulose, an organic compound that researcher Sebastian Pattinson called “the most abundant organic polymer in the world.”

“It’s biodegradable and inexpensive. It’s used in many applications — for example, anywhere wood is used — because it’s mechanically pretty robust and chemically very versatile,” says Pattinson.

Read more.


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1 Comment

  1. This is what makes 3d printers great!

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