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Robot Archaeology: Robotic Coin Banks #Robots #MakeRobotFriend

We all are exposed to piggy banks as children: our family encouraging us to save our coins up. But the simple porcelain pig has become much more over the years.

In the mid-1800s, mechanical banks appeared. They often were cast iron with springs to trigger flinging a coin into the bank slot.

Mechanical_Bank

With the widespread availability of batteries, designers sought to motorize banks in creative ways. Here is a list of some of the robotic banks we’ve found interesting:

electronic banks

Here at Adafruit, we’re creating projects for the new Adafruit Crickit robotics control board.

Crickit

We’ve got some motorized bank ideas we’ll be developing in coming days – do you have some great ideas on automated banks? Please post them in the comments below!


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