Facebook claiming people showing art, electronics, wheelchair modifications is “hate speech” – our video Show and Tell removed from Facebook (update)

Facebook is claiming our video show and tell where people share art, electronics, modified wheelchairs, and other projects, is hate speech now. There was no option to have it reviewed only to “agree” so no one sees it.

Will update this post if Facebook responds to our inquiry via our Facebook rep and/or press/legal email(s).

After it hit hackernews, the post is now back (May 15, 2023 – 11am ET).


The video is still on every platform (besides Meta’s Facebook), here it is on YouTube. Transcript below –

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. Ladyada, what is this?

Ladyada:
Hey, everybody. And welcome to Show & Tell. It’s us, Ladyada. Mr. Ladyada, here as your hosts. Also with us is an ultra intelligent Hypercube AI, streaming live.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is Agatha, the AGI, that’s taking over our jobs. See, this is a new host. Everybody meets your new host. Yeah.

Ladyada:
No, cute little demo.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is from the Feather DVI. And we’re using this in graphics for our show. I just thought it reminded me of the Max Engine background. Some of the folks are going to show this.

Ladyada:
It’s Artificial Graphical Intelligence. Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Some of the folks on the Show & Tell are going to probably show some projects with this and we’re going to also show it off and ask an engineer. But I thought this was neat because we use StreamYard and we can use camera, add another camera. And this just shows up as a camera.

Ladyada:
How fun.

Mr. Ladyada:
Because they have a HTMI to USB capture.

Ladyada:
Cool.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is neat. And then if you have green screens, you can do more. You’ll see some of this in the show.

Ladyada:
All right. But back to the topic. It’s Show & Tell, which means we’re going to have people from the A food community, the maker community, and anybody who really comes by the StreamYard, we posted the link in Discord. Anyone’s welcome to come by.

Mr. Ladyada:
This goes right to Liz because Liz has a demo using this.

Ladyada:
Let’s check out what she’s up to.

Mr. Ladyada:
Hey, Liz, what is your AGI doing?

Liz:
Well this is Spot.

Mr. Ladyada:
Spot.

Liz:
I did the Arduino video synth project. And so, with the CircuitPython support, I’ve been trying to port some of the demos over. This is the feather DVI rang CircuitPython. And I took Phil BE’S bouncing circle demo and brought that in. And then, I have a couple others I can quickly queue.

Ladyada:
Go for it.

Liz:
I’ll go into the REPL and then there’s proof that it’s running in CircuitPython.

Mr. Ladyada:
Proof of life.

Ladyada:
I love that you just got the embedded video input.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh. One thing you can do, here’s an idea for a future thing too. I don’t know, we’ll have to talk later. You can make the background green. And that could be a green screen and the text would just float above some of your video. That’d be cool.

Liz:
That’s definitely something I want to try. And then this is the Synthwave demo. And so this is just…

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s nice.

Liz:
Moving the lines. And then if I press this button here, the sun will rise. And it goes back.

Mr. Ladyada:
Is this is advertisements for a beach in Tron.

Liz:
Yes. And then, the other one that I got going was static. That’s pretty simple. You’re just drawing random pixels and let me save and reload. It’s all pretty quick. There we go.

Mr. Ladyada:
Awesome.

Liz:
Then I’ve got some sliders that can change the color of the palette. Or off. And then if I press the button it all goes white. I’m going to try to port a couple others and see there. But it’s been really nice doing a CircuitPython because the only thing with the Arduino is you have to compile and everything. It’s a lot faster to iterate. If you forget to change one color value you’re not wasting another two minutes.

Ladyada:
Yeah, no it’s fun.

Mr. Ladyada:
Can you do those magic eye things where you stare at it for a while and a picture emerges? Or is this already that? Is it happening?

Liz:
I mean, while I’m working on it, definitely start to have that effect.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah, I could see a cube or something come out.

Liz:
Yeah. It comes out.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is super cool.

Liz:
Cool. Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Thanks, Liz.

Ladyada:
Thank you, Liz.

Liz:
Have a good one.

Ladyada:
Okay. Next up let’s go to Scott and then after Scott we’ll go to Brandon and then Jepler. And then we’ll just keep going down the line here. Scott, what you got going on?

Scott:
Hello. I have been working out CircuitPirate, but I’ve been mixing other stuff in because I’m doing a lot of parsing stuff in it. It’s a bit taxing. I had this project that I saw this on the blog, somebody made the eInk frame where they were using Pirate Weather, which is a weather forecasting service.
And they have these neat icons for the 24 hours of today and tomorrow and then each daily one. And I thought that was really neat. And I wanted to reproduce it on the inky frame, which is a Pimoroni board with the seven color eInk on it. And I took an existing weather thing that we have on the Learn system and I switched it over to Pirate Weather. And it uses, or it presents the Dark Sky API, which turns out to be too much for the Pico W on the eInk frame to handle memory-wise.
Somebody had mentioned like, “Oh, maybe we should do a streaming JSON API.” And so, I looked at what existing libraries were made and saw one that made sense to me called JSON’s Stream. And that’s what I re-implemented. What I have up here is import adafruit_json_stream as json_stream.
And then, when I do the load for the request, what I’m saying is parse the JSON but from the content iterator that the request response has for it. It never has to load the giant chunk of the whole text because it’s 32K of text. You don’t want to load it all.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Scott:
I tried. It doesn’t work. And then what you can do is the object that it returns that I’m here calling JSON data, you can just treat it any other JSON object that you would. But there is a huge caveat that you need to know. And that it’s dynamically picking all of this stuff out of the stream. You have to access things from JSON in the order that you get it, which is a trick. And if you don’t do that, it won’t be able to find the key that you’re looking for.
For example, offset here, if I had gotten it once, I can’t get it again for example because I’m already by it. It looks the same and it acts the same, but it has this property where you really have to know the order that things are going to come to you in.
And in this case, I do and it means that I can spend a lot less memory doing the parsing. What I’m doing here is I’m accessing the things as I need it and then storing them in data structures that I’m going to use later to actually present it on the display. It allows me to not load a bunch of data that I’m not going to use. I can go through it as I get it, as it comes in and pick up the things that I actually want to use.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is cool. With the pipe and the MagTag, I remember we were doing demo projects. And sometimes the feeds that we were hitting was just the classic photo of a snake eating an elephant. Yeah. We can’t do it.

Scott:
Yeah. It does use allocations but it’s doing it one value at a time. And it uses the built-in JSON library under the hood to parse the strings and stuff.

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s cool.

Scott:
It’s just like what you’re talking about. It’s like you don’t have the big animal going through the Python. You get lots of little small things going through it instead.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is handy. All right. When, where what can people find out more about this?

Scott:
I’m done for today pretty much after this, but tomorrow I’ll post it and you can find it. Just Adafruit, CircuitPython, JSON Stream. If you want to know more, you can take a look at the JSON Stream library that already exists but it doesn’t use the built-in JSON for parsing. It’s a lot larger. But the one that I made here is somewhere on the order of 200 lines.

Ladyada:
Yeah. This is really great, especially you mentioned for the PICO W because you’re already losing so much memory to the SSL stack that you need it. We’re talking about the S3, there’s ESP32-S3s that have four megabytes of PSRAM, but on the Pico W you’re limited.

Scott:
Yeah. Yeah. And I actually experimented with trying to change CircuitPython then to give me more memory and that still wasn’t enough.

Ladyada:
No. Well, this is really useful though.

Scott:
But I was brewing on it.

Ladyada:
I mean my part, there’s JSONs that I get that are 500K. There is, I mean at some point you’re like, “Uh-oh, I actually can’t fit it.”

Scott:
Yeah. Hopefully I think that the requests, the Adafruit request implementation I think is actually good enough that it will only load so much data before… It should, I think push back all the way to the TCP level of ingesting the data as you need it instead of… You’ll never get the whole response if you can’t.

Mr. Ladyada:
Okay. This might be neat to combine this with some of the DBI, the screen stuff because you could get some really interesting data sources and then display them on a TV.

Ladyada:
Very cool.

Scott:
Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Very handy for-

Scott:
When you’re memory limited.

Ladyada:
Yeah. Yeah, we were doing the DBI, that this new product this week is the DBI, Cowbell. And I definitely choked up. I was like, “Oh my God, I want to do some cool data stuff.” And I was like, “Oh my god, I have 5K free.”

Scott:
Yep. Yeah. Yeah, so it does use memory, it will churn memory but it won’t do super big bulk stuff hopefully.

Mr. Ladyada:
Okay.

Ladyada:
All right. Well, thank you so much, Scott.

Mr. Ladyada:
People are posting in the chat cool things they want to get to now. They’re going to test this out for you.

Ladyada:
All right.

Scott:
Thank you.

Ladyada:
Thank you, Scott.

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s up. We’re going to go to Brent and then jump over to Brent.

Ladyada:
Brent.

Mr. Ladyada:
Brent, what you got going on?

Brent Rubell:
Hi. I’m also doing optimization related things. I’ll share a video and then of an issue I hit this past week and I’ll talk about how I got over it. And I’ll share that. I have the video. I don’t know if you can add that to the show, Phil.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Brent Rubell:
This is LVGL, which is a lightweight graphics library, running on a FunHouse. And the FunHouse is also running our WHIPPER!SNAPPER application, which is our no-code way to do IoT projects. And this is where it’s at. It’s really nice. It has this little status bar along the top. It also has tips that rotate around, like a video game loading screen. And it connects to Wi-Fi, it attempts to connect to I/O, this issue I’m currently working on. And then there’s an error screen when it doesn’t connect to I/O with the wrong credentials.
But once you connect to Wi-Fi, there’s a really jarring issue where it sits at 100% CPU usage. And that was starting to hit me last month and I worked around it with Phil B, who came up with the, we had this library called LVGL Glue, so all of the Adafruit displays can use LVGL in a really easy to use way and Phil BP or Dragon developed it.
And I was working with him on getting around this issue because it seems like every single time you do a project and you bring in the overhead of Wi-Fi or the overhead of display and Wi-Fi and NeoPixels, it’s like you’re really starting to constrict what you can actually do. This issue cropped up again and again and again. And it got past it but it didn’t get totally past it.
Today I spent time working on… I realized that LVGL isn’t threat safe. And what that means is the ESP32 runs on realtime operating system. And there could be memory corruption between things trying to access when the Wi-Fi is connecting and also LVGL trying to render. I currently have a board running nothing. This is just running LPGL.
Hold on. Of course, I just bumped it. Great. I don’t know why it’s resetting right now. I got it down to four to 6% utilization when it’s running LVGL now. It puts it on another core and it puts the Wi-Fi on a separate core. And every time it needs to call LVGL within the WHIPPER!SNAPPER application code, it locks the resources as well.
Everything is now done really nicely. And then, if people are looking to make their own projects that use this, I’m going to work on making it a nice, easy to use API. People who want to do IoT projects and display their data in a really nice way and send it to the internet, which is what everybody wants to do, can actually do it.

Ladyada:
Yeah, definitely. It’s because you’re chatting with me and I’m like, it is a color system integration and this is the hard part. It’s like, okay, you’ve got the graphics. Okay, you’ve got the Wi-Fi. Okay, you’ve got the status messages. Okay, you got NQTT. But then, you actually try to put it together and that’s when things get complicated.

Brent Rubell:
Yeah.

Ladyada:
Because you can really get solutions. You’re like, okay, I’m going to use mutexs, I’m going to use multiple cores. There’s a lot of stuff out there for micro controls that’s not threat safe, it wasn’t designed to run on FreeRTOS, but sometimes it’s still faster to figure out how to do your own memory management than re-write the libraries that you’re using. But it is definitely a thing that happens. Everyone’s bumped into, or you will bump into it.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Brent Rubell:
And I guess our job here is to prevent people from bumping into these things as well. Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
We make all the mistakes, spend all the time so you don’t have to.

Ladyada:
Yeah, there’s actually a early thing in CircuitPython Scott was really focused on how can we lock resources because we don’t want to have two things trying to connect to the icecore C interface. You can have an OLED on icecore at C and still connect to a sensor and it does the right thing. It magically never corrupts the data. That’s not true in Arduino all the time.

Brent Rubell:
Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Really?

Brent Rubell:
Especially the ESP32 port support package. It’s such a deeply integrated package that it’s like there are RTOS in there as well.

Mr. Ladyada:
Brent, coming back and show the progress of this.

Brent Rubell:
Yeah. Once now that it’s working faster, I want to actually show it working completely.

Ladyada:
Okay. But it’s good to show the struggle.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Brent Rubell:
Yeah, yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Its your work here. It’s not, it all just doesn’t come out perfect the first try.

Brent Rubell:
Nope.

Ladyada:
All right. Thank you, Brent.

Mr. Ladyada:
Thanks so much, man. All right, Jep, what you get going on this week?

Jepler:
Hello. We’re in a little bit different perspective on me because I got a new to me computer.

Mr. Ladyada:
Whoa.

Ladyada:
Yay.

Jepler:
I was at an estate sale a couple of weekends ago. And I saw this and the keyboard and I’m like, well, that’s interesting, but I mean what would I do with it? And then I saw the two eight inch floppies and I’m like, that’s cool, but it’s not like it’s going to work. And so, I wired it all up in this guy’s basement and booted it to CPM and I’m like, “I can’t say no anymore to this.”

Ladyada:
Yay.

Jepler:
And I brought it home and I was playing with it until suddenly the smoke started coming out of this capacitor.

Ladyada:
Uh-oh.

Jepler:
That was no fun. And now I’ve recapped some power supplies, so superpower unlocked. Anyway, so I was going through my four boxes of floppies and let’s see if we can get this on the screen here. Not runt.

Ladyada:
Runt.

Jepler:
For Pete’s sake. Okay. How do you recover from this? Well, I was going to run a program but I typed runt and now we’re just done.

Ladyada:
[inaudible 00:15:32] is it going to take too long to recover?

Mr. Ladyada:
And that’s it. Now you have to buy a new one.

Jepler:
And that’s it.

Ladyada:
Can you [inaudible 00:15:40]?

Jepler:
Come back to me in two minutes. I don’t want to have the drive box on because it sounds like a washing machine, but I’ll reload everything.

Mr. Ladyada:
We’ll come back to you. Yeah, we’ll come back to you.

Ladyada:
Okay.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Did you turn it on, plug in and plug it back in?

Ladyada:
Oh, wait.

Jepler:
There we go.

Ladyada:
Now it’s running.

Mr. Ladyada:
Here you go.

Jepler:
Now it’s running.

Ladyada:
Okay. You recovered. Okay.

Mr. Ladyada:
[inaudible 00:15:58] enterprise?

Jepler:
Yes. Oh, yeah. Here we are. Your orders are as follows. Destroy the 18 Klingon worships, which have invaded the galaxy.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Jepler:
This is a classic game ported it to a lot of systems of the era.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is what Google showed off at Google I/O today. This is their AI.

Jepler:
And I have no idea how to play it, so we’ll figure that out later. But yeah, I’m just really excited to have this system and I’m also going to figure out how to not put CircuitPython on it, but connect CircuitPython as a device to it to enable something. I’ll come back when that’s ready.

Ladyada:
Ooh, you have a…

Jepler:
But that’s why I’ve got a 1980s computer.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is super cool. The total age on this is what? Probably 50 years?

Ladyada:
It’s probably 50?

Jepler:
No, it’s 1981 or 1982 new hardware. It’s comparatively new. It’s younger than me.

Mr. Ladyada:
Okay. All right. Still a spring chicken. Okay, thanks very much, Jep.

Ladyada:
Very cool. Yeah, I’ll put to DVI. You can have a connect to the internet using CircuitPython as an intermediary. A lot of options.

Jepler:
Yeah. There’s all sorts of possibilities.

Ladyada:
Okay. Cool.

Jepler:
Just have to write some CPR code to do it.

Ladyada:
Track.bas. Thank you, Jepler. And good work.

Mr. Ladyada:
Let’s connect here Melissa. What you going on, Melissa?

Melissa:
Okay. If you want to share my screen here. I have been working on a little bit of code here for the platform detect for Blinker. One of the issues we’ve been having is they add a lot of new rev codes and we currently have just this list that we’re just looking up on, so it doesn’t really do much on it. I’ve been writing some stuff to decode it all.
And so, this is just a little test script here, but it’s using a class that I wrote. If I do something like d03114, then it’s going to go ahead and tell me all the information about that rev code. If I want to run it again and do one of the old style rev codes like that, it’ll go ahead and decode all that stuff.

Ladyada:
Oh, nice.

Melissa:
If I go ahead and I run it and we give it a invalid rev code, something like this, then it’ll… Oh. It’s doing that.

Ladyada:
Yeah, it’s not valid.

Melissa:
Yeah, I ran this earlier and it wasn’t… I’m not sure what that is.

Mr. Ladyada:
Put it back on.

Melissa:
It’s a bug I need to fix I guess. But let me try that again because it didn’t do that earlier.

Ladyada:
Maybe it started with a zero and it parsed as… Is it Opta or something?

Melissa:
Yeah, say that’s what it’s supposed to do. It did I think the exact same thing here and it worked. Anyways, supposed to say, “This code is invalid,” blah blah, blah.

Ladyada:
Great.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. And then where, if folks want to find out more about this, where, when, when, what, how?

Melissa:
Well, I am going to go ahead and submit a poll request soon.

Mr. Ladyada:
Good.

Melissa:
I just want to go ahead and, well, fix that bug, first of all. And then I want to modify it so that it just goes ahead and checks it on platform detect.

Ladyada:
Yeah, check out Blinker support and CircuitPython.org. All the different boards that we support through Blinker.

Melissa:
Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. Thanks so much, Melissa.

Ladyada:
All right.

Melissa:
Thank you.

Ladyada:
Thank you, Melissa. All right.

Mr. Ladyada:
Next up, JP.

Ladyada:
JP.

Mr. Ladyada:
JP, what you got going on?

JP:
I was just typing over here because Scott is actually trying to push the JSON streamer thing and he was asking me about the sports viewer that I had on MagTag. He’s serious about this. He’s in real time, putting this thing out during the show.

Mr. Ladyada:
It’s happening.

JP:
I decided to have as many scrolling things as possible because that’s the theme today. The main thing I want to show though is this little guy here, I’ll just hold it up. It’s going to be blown out. Sorry, I can’t control this camera for that, but this is what I was showing. Yeah, I’ll keep it up here.

Ladyada:
Don’t worry.

JP:
I was showing yesterday on my product pick of the week because I was using a matrix portal with one of our nice 64 by 64 LED displays. And I happened to figure out through just playing around with it, that that display is exactly 18 Lego studs wide. It’s very easy to make your own Lego case for the 64 by 64 2.5 millimeter pitch, which is what I did. This has some of our acrylic LED plastic to help with diffusion a little bit. But that’s all I wanted to show is that I had a fun Lego build and I’ve got a little cool guy there who’s very mysterious.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is one of those cosmic coincidences. Just like the moon is the same size in the sky as the sun. That’s why we can do total eclipses. Super freaky.

JP:
Why would it be 18, exactly?

Mr. Ladyada:
Why? Why? Why?

JP:
I can’t tell.

Mr. Ladyada:
Well, it had to happen.

Ladyada:
Check out JP’s conspiracy YouTube for more.

JP:
Listen, guys. It goes deep.

Mr. Ladyada:
Tomorrow, what are you going to show on your show?

JP:
Tomorrow, we’ll be playing around with some synth I/O stuff that Jeff has been developing and that I am building into the computer perfection 1980s toy ashtray sci-fi prop thing that Will discovered.

Mr. Ladyada:
And speaking of Robert Smith, not the Cure singer, but a well-known Robert Smith now, is doing some toy controller hacking and just posted up on Twitter. Lots of people are posting up their wishlist things. We put some photos up on our flicker of the USBC version of the one that you made. And then Robert put up a guide. If anyone wants to hack toys that weren’t meant to be getting control of, we have a new guide. Yeah, it’s really neat.

JP:
Yes, that’s great. In fact, I have something also from the Fisher-Price line that is on the clock…

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah, we got one.

JP:
For something at some point. It includes a spring-loaded cartridge that, I don’t know, I just want to gnaw on all of these now.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. All right. Well, thank you so much, JP.

JP:
All right.

Mr. Ladyada:
And see what you can do. All right. Next up we’re going to go to Deshipu, then Delchi and then DJ Devon. Deshipu, I haven’t seen in a while.

Ladyada:
Hello. What’s up?

Mr. Ladyada:
What you got going on? Oh, unmute your mic when you get a chance.

Deshipu:
Now it’s working.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Ladyada:
Okay.

Mr. Ladyada:
How you doing?

Deshipu:
I’m great. The show is a bit late for me because I’m in Europe. That’s why I’m not coming here.

Mr. Ladyada:
What you got? What you working on?

Deshipu:
Yeah. Well, you probably… I posted photos of this. You saw this robot?

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah, it’s cute.

Deshipu:
That’s we’ve built a couple dozen of those recently on the ConDE Berlin. And yeah, it’s basically eight server walking robot, walk like this.

Mr. Ladyada:
Awesome.

Deshipu:
And because this is an ESP32-S2, it also exposes a website. Yeah. Such a shame you can’t see it.

Ladyada:
Yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
It’s all good.

Ladyada:
We believe you.

Deshipu:
Basically with four buttons that you can use to control.

Mr. Ladyada:
To control it. You have remote control, robotic crab spider.

Deshipu:
Yeah. Basically that. I also developed a number of… Because this is the S2 mini development board, so you can use any of the shields that are for D1 mini or S2 mini.

Mr. Ladyada:
Ah.

Deshipu:
And I also developed a number of sheets you can use as a face. For instance, this nice round display.

Ladyada:
Oh, cute.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s good. You can put different faces on it. Ah, that’s a friendly crab.

Deshipu:
But you can also put a sensor, for instance, a distance sensor.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, wow.

Deshipu:
Or a gesture sensor on it so that you can train it to do tricks depending on what gestures you do in front of it or things like that. With Jeff doing a lot of work some year ago with the camera, I also made a camera shoot for it. You can put a camera on it. And you can actually modify the HTTP server in CircuitPython to stream from that camera. Then you can, on that website you have with those four both buttons, you also have the stream from the camera.

Ladyada:
Neat.

Deshipu:
I don’t have that working right now. As I said, you need to hack the HTTP server library a little bit to not close the socket. Because I’m using I think I/O internally to do several things at once, stream from the camera and walk at the same time, for instance.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is super neat. If folks want to build these, where can they find out more information?

Deshipu:
Right. I put everything on Hackaday.io, so all the documentation is in there. I will post a link in the Discord that they can use.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, thanks.

Deshipu:
I just wanted to quickly show one more guy.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. What else you got?

Deshipu:
I’m using those LiPo batteries that are quite convenient for me. Those are mostly used for vaping. And I found there is a battery that is a little bit smaller.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s cute.

Deshipu:
But looks the same. And there are also those servers that are a little bit smaller but they look the same.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, to implement your cute batteries and servers.

Deshipu:
I decided to make a robot battery.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s so cute.

Deshipu:
It’s the same but it’s small.

Ladyada:
Tiny.

Deshipu:
Its got the same kind of battery on this one.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah, that’s a cute little crab.

Ladyada:
Okay. It’s little friend.

Deshipu:
And it uses the… I don’t know if it’s actually Adafruit or if it is it SIT studio. This one is sit studio shower board, but [inaudible 00:26:04]

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that makes sense. You could use a little cutie… Oh, that’s cute.

Ladyada:
Cute.

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s cute. Are you going to put that up on your Hackaday.io profile?

Deshipu:
There is one problem. You can’t buy those servers anymore.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, you can’t buy them anymore? Okay. Well.

Deshipu:
Yeah, so I will put the design files up there because it is possible they will come back at some point.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s really nice.

Deshipu:
Those are from Jumper King and they discontinued them five years ago.

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s so cool.

Deshipu:
I have them in my drawer.

Mr. Ladyada:
I think the little one has, the movement is really nice. It looks very organic.

Deshipu:
Yeah, that’s because of the Async IO where I can have several layers of animation at the same time so I can move it forward. At the same time, a separate thread is moving the legs up and down. It’s very organic because of that. Because you don’t really have steps.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Deshipu:
It’s all happening like that.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. Very cool. We were just in a meeting lot too long ago. And I had watched a show about how everything eventually evolves to crabs in nature, everything eventually on a long enough timeline. It’s great.

Deshipu:
Yeah. Certification.

Ladyada:
It’s really hard work.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is starting to make me think it’s true. All right. Well, thank you so much, Deshipu.

Ladyada:
Bye, Deshipu.

Mr. Ladyada:
Great to see you.

Deshipu:
You too.

Ladyada:
Nice to see you.

Deshipu:
Bye.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. We’re going to go to Delchi and then DJ Devon’s going to play us up. Delchi, what you got going on?

Delchi:
Hello, hello. Can you hear me?

Ladyada:
Yeah.

Delchi:
The long awaited finally returned of rolling thunder.

Mr. Ladyada:
Woo.

Ladyada:
Yeah.

Delchi:
We have re-outfitted it with NeoPixels and we’ve got a fresh Raspberry Pi 4 on the back. It does a Wi-Fi hotspot. It projects a Galaxy projector, that’s the little spaceman on the upper corner there.

Ladyada:
Oh, yeah.

Delchi:
It has a sound system and it runs Kismet in the background.

Mr. Ladyada:
Well, yeah.

Ladyada:
Okay.

Delchi:
I just today got this back going after a complete refit of the motor assembly and fresh batteries and rewiring. The pi goes back on next and then all new code in time to roll this down the street to DevCon.

Ladyada:
Yay.

Mr. Ladyada:
Outstanding. All right.

Ladyada:
That’s awesome.

Delchi:
And even more fun, over on the bench. This is a gift for a friend of mine. Back in the 1980s, RadioShack made these little toy fireman’s hats. And you can see it had a little battery and a rotating motor. And it would just rotate around. And it was literally a physical motor and a piece of metal and an old light bulb. I gutted it and I put in a little Adafruit board, a little NeoPixel or two. And when you hit the switch.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, cool.

Delchi:
I don’t know if you can hear it.

Mr. Ladyada:
Just a little bit. Yeah.

Delchi:
It plays the Bee-doo alarm from Minions.

Ladyada:
Nice.

Delchi:
Yeah, hold it up. And there you go.

Ladyada:
Oh, yeah.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

Delchi:
And it’s programmable through the USB cable. But you can see I kept the original structure and just took out the original parts. And there’s battery acid everywhere and it was just pure evil. But I moded up and it’s going to get cleaned up a little bit, a little coat of paint and going back out to one of my friends.

Ladyada:
Sweet.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. Excellent project. And if you have any photos of either one of them, let us know. We’ll post them out.

Delchi:
This is a piece of ancient technology called a Craft Access Terminal.

Mr. Ladyada:
Ooh.

Delchi:
It’s very similar to what people call a lineman’s handset, except it had a 300 baud modem in it, and you could use it to connect to the switch, to turn a phone on or off if you were a lineman doing your job.
What I’ve done is I have gutted most of it because who needs a 300 baud modem anymore? I replaced the screen with a pi portal, which fits perfectly right in that spot. I’m getting a GPIO expander board, so I can use the original keypad to do touch tones. And it’s going to become a portable lineman set with using pi portal.

Ladyada:
Nice.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s cool.

Ladyada:
That’s a great project.

Delchi:
It’ll be a dialer. It’ll do your various boxes. I’ve already started on the code. But I’m missing a few parts, which are on their way to me, which I ordered two days ago. I’m very, very excited about that.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right.

Delchi:
And again, I hope to have that all good to go in time to show it off at DevCon.

Mr. Ladyada:
Outstanding. All right. Well, thank you so much. And send us any photos or put them in the chats so folks can find out more.

Delchi:
Yes, this I will do.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right.

Ladyada:
All right. Watch out driving down to DevCon because people are going to think that you’re part of some casino display. They’re going to be like, “I want…” They’re going to try yanking things on you to see if coins come out.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. DJ Devon, play us out.

DJ Devon:
Oh, can you hear me?

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah.

DJ Devon:
Okay. There’s been a lot of feather DVI projects. I did a temperature thing.

Mr. Ladyada:
Cool. That’s nice.

DJ Devon:
There’s a temperature up here. Or pressure and then humidity over there. And give me one second here.

Mr. Ladyada:
What’s the 1015.9? What’s that?

DJ Devon:
That’s the pressure.

Mr. Ladyada:
Got it.

Ladyada:
All right. Looks great.

DJ Devon:
And then, I cheated because you can’t put the airlift on there. Because it is just not enough RAM. And I tried GIFIO2 and yeah, it just doesn’t work like that. I cheated. And these are three different browser windows open. And obviously, you guys and Brent will probably recognize WHIPPER!SNAPPER is running in the background.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah, that’s a good idea.

DJ Devon:
If you combine that with that. And I used, I bought from Adafruit and HDMI capture, so I’m capturing this.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh.

DJ Devon:
Overlaying that. And we get this.

Mr. Ladyada:
Oh, that’s a good idea.

Ladyada:
Oh, check that out. That’s nice.

Mr. Ladyada:
That’s a good idea. That’s a good idea.

DJ Devon:
A pragmatic use of the Feather DVI.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Yeah. This is neat. This is what we were hoping people would do with this because you can mix and match a bunch of different data sources and then you could do some neat things with video overlays. And then you get your own dashboard the way you want it.

DJ Devon:
Exactly.

Ladyada:
It’s pretty cool.

DJ Devon:
Yeah, it’s pretty cool.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. Awesome.

DJ Devon:
And as you can see and this will be on my GitHub under Feather DVI, because I have a boards Raspberry Pi, Feather DVI. I organize my boards just like you guys.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right.

Ladyada:
All right.

Mr. Ladyada:
This is a great project.

Ladyada:
Nice work.

DJ Devon:
As you can see, it’s getting pretty hot in Florida. And I’m pretty sure that I got a fever right now. There’s only one prescription.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Wear a cowbell. Yay.

Ladyada:
Yay.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right.

Ladyada:
It’s a part at DJ Devon’s house.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. That was an excellent way to play out Show & Tell.

Ladyada:
Thank you, DJ Devon, also known Dragon Jockey Devon.

Mr. Ladyada:
All right. That’s our Show & Tell for the night.

Ladyada:
I don’t even know what I just saw.

Mr. Ladyada:
We’ll be back next week. Thank you so much, everybody. Amazing projects and more.

Ladyada:
The creativity’s amazing.

Mr. Ladyada:
Yeah. Thanks for making this the best half an hour a week, every single week. We love seeing the projects. We’ll see everybody on Ask an Engineer in just a couple minutes. Bye, everybody.

Ladyada:
Bye, everybody-


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1 Comment

  1. So sad to see this. I hope it gets resolved soon!

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